Guest Opinion
Osterberg: Cuts go too far for a tax-cutter
By David Osterberg

Published June 13, 2018, by The Gazette, Cedar Rapids
Gazette link




The attack on higher education funding by the governor and legislative leadership have gone too far for at least one longtime tax-cutter.

Former State Senator Larry McKibben, now a member of the Iowa Board of Regents, expressed his concern about state support of universities. The Regents voted Thursday to raise university tuition rates at Iowa, Iowa State and Northern Iowa, following $40 million in state funding cuts.

McKibben was forthright in blaming the recent legislative session for an increase in tuition at the three state universities and the loss of professors to better positions after years of low salary increases. From the Cedar Rapids Gazette story on the Regents’ meeting:

“We have lost great folks, and now we are going to have to raise tuition,” McKibben said, noting that will persist “as long as we continue what I believe is, in my time on the board, the worst state government attack on our three public universities that I can ever remember.”

In fairness, the groundwork has been laid for this latest attack over many years. An Iowa Fiscal Partnership report in 2012 showed how real spending on the UI, ISU and UNI dropped from fiscal year 2000 through fiscal year 2012.

An Iowa Policy Project analysis by Brandon Borkovec this year showed that adjusting for inflation, state funding for Iowa public universities has declined since fiscal year 2001 by 40 percent at UI, 42 percent at ISU, and 28 percent at UNI.

As a percentage of university budgets, the state share dropped by almost half from fiscal years 2001 to 2016.

Some of this happened on McKibben’s watch as one of the Legislature’s most powerful lawmakers on tax policy — one who often looked for ways to cut taxes, as he did in 2003 with a proposed flat tax that would have cost over $500 million.

He did not intervene to rein in the Research Activities Credit, which sends more than $40 million a year to profitable corporations that pay no income taxes to the state.

He turned the other way as corporations raided Iowa’s treasury through tax loopholes at a cost of $60 million to $100 million a year.

As Regent McKibben, his new concern is understandable and his advocacy for college students laudable. He wants Iowa voters to pay attention and ask what candidates will do about severe underfunding that he says will assure more tuition increases. From the story in The Gazette:

“I look forward to hearing the candidates say that,” McKibben said. “What are you going to do about higher education and our three great universities? And what are you going to do to bring them back to level?”

These same trends were happening when McKibben was a legislator. Now, it seems, the Governor and state legislative leaders have gone too far, even for him.

davidosterberg
David Osterberg is founder and former executive director of the nonpartisan Iowa Policy Project in Iowa City.

Contact: dosterberg@iowapolicyproject.org